Historical and Commemorative Medals
Collection of Benjamin Weiss

ON THE CONFEDERATION OF THE SEVEN NORTHERN PROVINCES OF THE NETHERLANDS

DADLER, Sebastian: Netherlands, 1651, Silver, 65 mm
Obv: Sitting on cliffs emblazoned with the coat of arms of the seven provinces of The Netherlands is the personification of Holland holding a lance with the Cap of Victory in the right hand and a decapitated head in the left hand. UT RUPES IMMOTA MARI STANT FOEDERE IUNCTI  (Just as a rocky headland is unmoved by the sea, so [are we] joined by our treaty). 
Rev: DUM TOTUS MIRATUR ORBIS ET ANCEPS EXSPECTAT QUO RES FOEDERATI BELGII A MORTE ARAUSIONENSIUM PRIN- CIPIS EVASURAE SINT ALIIS ALIA AUGURANTIBUS MAGNA BATAVO- RUM AULA AD SOLENNE PROCERUM CONSILIUM APERTA TANDEM ANNU- ENTE DEO RELIGIONE FOEDERE ET MILITIA FORTITER ASSERTIS SOCII IN ORBEM DATIS ACCEPTIS QUE MANIBUS A SE INVICEM AMICE DI- MISSI MALORUM SPEM AC VOTA FEFELLERUNT BONORUM SU- PERARUNT. M DC LI. XXVI AUGUSTI. IN CUIUS REI MEMORIAM ZELANDIAE PROCERES NUMISMA HOC CUDI IUSSERUNT.
(While the entire world marvels and waits in uncertainty as to how affairs of a confederated Netherlands will turn out after the death of William, Prince of Orange, with different people predicting different things, with the great hall of the Dutch opened at long last to the solemn council of leaders, and with the good favor of God, and with religion, the treaty and the army forcefully affirmed, the allies, after having given and taken one another's hands in turn and parted from one another on mutually friendly terms, confounded the hope and desires of evil men and surpassed those of good men. To commemorate this event, the magistrates of Zeeland ordered this medal to be struck on 26 August, 1651.)
Signed: S D
Ref: V. Loon II, 350 I; KPK 803; Wiecek 124/135; Riechmann 19,676;  Maué 77;  Weiss BW583

This medal ratifies the confederation of the seven provinces of the Netherlands after the death of William II of Nassau-Orange. The provinces of the republic were Holland, Zeeland, Utrecht, Gelre, Overijssel, Friesland and Groningen. Each province was governed by the Provincial States and by a stadtholder. In theory, the stadtholders were elected and subordinate to the States-General. However, the princes of Orange-Nassau were chosen as stadtholders of most of the provinces. There was a constant power struggle between the Orangists, who supported the stadtholders, and the Regent's supporters. After the Peace of Westphalia several border territories were assigned to the United Provinces.

William II, Prince of Orange (1626-1650), was stadtholder of several Dutch provinces. In 1641 he married Mary, daughter of Charles I of England.  He was succeeded by his son William III  (1650-1702) of Orange.  In 1677, William III of Orange married Mary, daughter of James, Duke of York (the future James II of England).  This couple  later ruled jointly as William (III) and Mary (II) of England following the Glorious Revolution.

LINK to History of the Dutch Republic (from wikipedia)
 

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